Anxiety and its treatment


Anxiety and its treatment:

Anxiety is often described as feeling adrenalized, on edge, tense, a feeling of butterflies in the tummy, feeling wired, nervy. In the absence of a pre-existing mood disorder, anxiety may be a by-product of circumstances occurring in one’s life, e.g. separation or divorce, bankruptcy, illness of a spouse or family member, the loss of a parent or child, post traumatic shock, work stress, etc.

At York City Health Clinic, we tailor the treatment to suite your intricate needs, i.e. medications are mixed or compounded in our clinic dispensary to suite your specific case; not a one size fits all approach! Therefore, when taking our natural medications (anxiolytics) to relieve anxiety, one should not feel drowsy, tired, listless, or unable to function, but the converse, more relaxed, more grounded, more contained. From my 36 years of experience as a clinician, my patient’s find they are able to focus and get on with the task at hand and begin to feel they have control again, therefore, they note an improvement in their quality of life.

Our treatments (specific formulations) that are provided, are a combination of the highest quality pharmaceutical herbal extracts, or specific amino acids, and in some cases, both are prescribed. It has been my experience with those who are amicable to taking anxiolytics, or agents that can assist in elevating their mood, these patients benefit more during their counselling sessions with their therapist, as they are more focused and willing to make the changes required, i.e. they are more prepared to listen and use the tools they are taught by their respective counsellor.

As John McGuire is an ‘EXPERT REVIEWER for the HEALTH CARE COMPLAINTS COMMISSION (HCCC) of NSW’, one can be assured that they are in both safe and competent hands. If you would like to read more about anxiety and how it affects mood, please read on…………….

Anxiety Defined

Anxiety is often described as feeling adrenalized, on edge, tense, a feeling of butterflies in the tummy, feeling wired, nervy. It may affect the person with or without a clear understanding as to its cause. In the absence of a pre-existing mood disorder, anxiety may be a by-product of circumstances occurring in one’s life, e.g. bankruptcy, illness of a spouse or family member, the loss of a parent or child, post-traumatic stress, separation or divorce, work issues, etc. Anxiety may also present itself in the form of social anxiety, e.g. feeling self-conscious in the company of others, public speaking, eating in restaurants, being seen in public alone generally, etc. Anxiety may also be categorised as a phobia (social or simple) triggered by e.g. enclosed spaces, a fear of heights, flying, insects, etc. Irrespective of its cause, anxiety can become so severe and overwhelming, it may develop into a full blown panic attack. Agoraphobia is a fear of feeling confined, trapped e.g. of being alone in public, having to travel on public transport or in a car, etc. This is one such condition that can occur concomitantly with panic attacks.

The onset of anxiety disorders, particularly social and simple phobias, is often noted in adolescence and precedes the onset of depression. Anxiety is a normal emotion in appropriate situations, but excessive anxiety in inappropriate situations can be disabling and is associated with a bilateral (two sided) increase in blood flow in a discrete portion of the anterior (frontal) end of each temporal lobe. (1)Therefore, it has been found that one fourth of patients with any anxiety disorder will also suffer a mood disorder. (2)

What Anxiolytic Medications Are and How They Work To Relieve Anxiety

Anxiolytic medications are a class of drugs, whether natural or synthetic, that can help reduce or alleviate anxiety. The motor neurons of the gamma efferent system are regulated to a large degree by descending tracts from a number of areas in the brain. Through these pathways, the sensitivity of the muscle spindles and hence the threshold of the stretch reflexes in various parts of the body can be adjusted and shifted to meet the needs of postural control. (3) As anxiety causes an increase in the gamma efferent discharge, this fact probably explains the hyperactive tendon reflexes sometimes seen in anxious patients. (4) Anxiolytic medication therefore influences the discharge of the motor neurons of the gamma efferent system, thus, producing a calming effect.

References

1. Ganong WF.Neural Basis of Instinctual Behaviour and Emotions. In: Review of Medical Physiology. 20th Edition New York: McGraw-Hill, 2001: (15):252

2. Humes H.David. Kelley’s Textbook of Internal Medicine. Depression, Anxiety, and other Psychiatric Disorders. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. A Wolters Kluwer Company. Maria D. Lorente, 2000: (39):249

3. Ganong WF.Neural Basis of Instinctual Behaviour and Emotions. In: Review of Medical Physiology. 20th Edition New York: McGraw-Hill, 2001: (15): 252

4. Ganong WF.Section 3. Functions of the Nervous System. Reflexes. In: Review of Medical Physiology. 20th Edition New York: McGraw-Hill, 2001: (6):126

YORK CITY HEALTH & NATURAL THERAPIES CENTRE

Naturopaths Sydney

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Sydney 2000

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Naturopath treatment York City Health Clinic

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